Classical Mechanics

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Mechanics

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Units and VectorsFree

Mechanics, as the study of motion, is mathematically based on units and vectors. Review unit notation and dimensional analysis to apply computations to real situations. Explore how vectors can easily combine information of both magnitude and direction for many useful quantities in physics.
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Unit vectorsFree

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Vectors and scalarsFree

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Adding vectorsFree

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Components of vectorsFree

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Multiplying vectorsFree

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Straight Line Motion

The simplest study of motion is that of one-dimensional straight line motion. How do you mathematically describe the motion of an object? Learn about the concepts of position, velocity and acceleration and how to apply the equations that govern the behavior of motion. Begin to understand gravity by exploring free-fall acceleration.
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Position, displacement, and average velocity

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Acceleration

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Constant acceleration

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Free-fall acceleration

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Motion in Higher Dimensions

In real life our world is three-dimensional. How does physics differ between one- and three-dimensional space? Extend your knowledge of straight line motion to multiple dimensions. Apply both projectile and circular motion as an exercise in higher dimension mathematics. Explore the concept of relative motion, how the motion of one object appears to another.
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Newton's Laws

In one amazing summer, Isaac Newton revolutionized our understanding of the universe. What made his laws of motion so revolutionary? Learn Newton's three Laws of Motion and apply them to understand how we describe not just the motion of objects, but how they interact with each other. Discover the concept of force and how it works.
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Kinetic Energy

Why do crashes at higher speed often cause more damage? Kinetic energy is the energy associated with all objects in motion. Explore this form of energy and how it relates to the concepts of motion. Discover the very important principle of Conservation of Energy.
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Work

Explore the concept of work in physics, how the word differs from the everyday usage, how it applies to Newton's Laws, and how it influences energy. Utilize the concept of work in examples such as gravitation and springs. Lastly, learn the definition of power and how it is used.
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Potential Energy

How does a rollercoaster make it all the way to the end of the track without an engine? Potential energy is the energy "stored" by objects that can be utilized at a later time. Learn how to calculate potential energy and apply it to various situations--even rollercoasters! Discover the concept of path independence and how it relates to work.
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Mass and Momentum

What do a slow-moving train and a fast-moving bullet have in common? Dive deeper into Newton's First Law and discover the concept of momentum. Learn to define momentum and utilize center of mass to simplify calculations. Extend your notion of conservation principles to momentum and relate momentum to energy. Apply your knowledge of momentum to study collisions in multiple dimensions.
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Rotational Motion

Rotating objects obey similar laws to those governing objects moving linearly. Translate your knowledge of velocity, acceleration, force, mass, energy and momentum into situations involving rotation. Relate linear variables to angular variables and apply angular variables to solve rotational motion problems.
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Equilibrium and Elasticity

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Equilibrium

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Elasticity

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Fluid Mechanics

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Gravitation

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Periodic Motion

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