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The "Glass Ceiling" in the Business World

GMAT-PRBE4T

Directions
This question presents a sentence, part of which or all of which is underlined. Beneath the sentence, you will find five ways of phrasing the underlined part. The first of these repeats the original; the other four are different. If you think the original is best, choose the first answer; otherwise, choose one of the others.

Some people in the business world argue that the so-called "glass ceiling" that many women say they experience is an outdated phenomenon; however, this claim is challenged by the reality that only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs, as well as by the common perception of women in leadership as being "aggressive" or "domineering," whereas the same traits are generally admired in men.

A

an outdated phenomenon; however, this claim is challenged by the reality that only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs, as well as by the common perception of women in leadership as being "aggressive" or "domineering," whereas the same traits are generally admired in men.

B

an outdated phenomenon: a claim that is challenged by the reality that only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs--as well as by the common perception of women in leadership as being "aggressive" or "domineering," whereas the same traits are generally admired in men.

C

an outdated phenomenon in a claim that is challenged by the reality that only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs; the common perception of women in leadership is that they are being "aggressive" or "domineering," whereas the same traits are generally admired in men.

D

an outdated phenomenon, a claim that is challenged by the reality: only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs, as well as by the common perception of women in leadership as being "aggressive" or "domineering," which are the same traits generally admired in men.

E

an outdated phenomenon, a claim being challenged by the reality that only 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 companies have female CEOs, as well as by the common perception of leading women as "aggressive" or "domineering," the same traits that are generally being admired in men.