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Traffic Stops

GMAT-GEYVU4

Study: Minorities pulled over as often as whites, but fare worse

Summary from Department of Justice Study

Appendix Table: Number of Survey Respondents in the 2002 Police-Public Contact Survey, by demographic characteristics of resident

Demographic characteristic All survey respondents Number of persons with police contact Number of persons against whom force was used or threatened
Total persons 76,910 15,731 209
Gender
Male 35,049 7,892 158
Female 41,861 7,839 51
Race/Hispanic origin
White 56,696 12,199 121
Black 8,101 1,492 46
Hispanic 8,929 1,542 37
Other race 3,184 498 5
Age
16-19 4,455 1,180 41
20-29 11,721 3,407 69
30-39 15,059 3,605 42
40-49 15,805 3,376 30
50-59 12,683 2,322 18
60 or older 17,187 1,841 9
Size of jurisdiction where resided
Under 100,000 57,167 11,810 138
100,000-499,999 11,331 2,462 34
500,000-999,999 3,111 683 16
1 million or more 5,301 776 21

Consider each of the following statements. Does the information in the three sources support the inference as stated?

Yes

No

Yes

No

"The fact that force was more likely to be used against blacks or Hispanics than whites is evidence of racial profiling, defined as when minorities are pulled over for traffic violations more frequently than whites."

Yes

No

"About one-fifth of all traffic stops each year end with the threat or use of force."

Yes

No

"The age group most likely to experience the threat or use of force during a traffic stop is the age 20-29 group."