?

King Lear

Free Version

Upgrade subject to access all content

Moderate

Lear: “My wits begin to turn” (Act 3, Scene 2)

KINGLR-N3UILD

In the midst of the storm, this conversation takes place between Kent, Lear, and the Fool (whom Lear turns to in this excerpt):

KENT
Alack, bare-headed!
Gracious my lord, hard by here is a hovel;
Some friendship will it lend you 'gainst the tempest:
Repose you there; while I to this hard house--
More harder than the stones whereof 'tis raised;
Which even but now, demanding after you,
Denied me to come in--return, and force
Their scanted courtesy.

KING LEAR
My wits begin to turn.
Come on, my boy: how dost, my boy? art cold?
I am cold myself. Where is this straw, my fellow?
The art of our necessities is strange,
That can make vile things precious. Come, your hovel.
Poor fool and knave, I have one part in my heart
That's sorry yet for thee.

What might Lear mean when he says “My wits begin to turn”?

Select ALL that apply.

A

He is ready to be reasonable and take shelter from the storm.

B

He is becoming even more mad.

C

He is experiencing the Fool’s humor in a new way.

D

He is perceiving the material world in a new way.

E

He is experiencing true compassion.