?

To Kill a Mockingbird

Free Version

Upgrade subject to access all content

Moderate

All Versus Some

TKAM-ELXGK2

What is the best description of the function, in the following passage, of Atticus' repeating the words "all" and "some" several times each?

Passage from Chapter 20:

The witnesses for the state, with the exception of the sheriff of Maycomb County, have presented themselves to you gentlemen, to this court, in the cynical confidence that their testimony would not be doubted, confident that you gentlemen would go along with them on the assumption—the evil assumption—that all Negroes lie, that all Negroes are basically immoral beings, that all Negro men are not to be trusted around our women, an assumption one associates with minds of their caliber.

Which, gentlemen, we know is in itself a lie as black as Tom Robinson’s skin, a lie I do not have to point out to you. You know the truth, and the truth is this: some Negroes lie, some Negroes are immoral, some Negro men are not to be trusted around women—black or white. But this is a truth that applies to the human race and to no particular race of men.

A

The repetition of the words "all" and "some" functions to lengthen Atticus' final address to the jury and make it sound more learned and impressive.

B

The repetition of the words "all" and "some" functions to contrast a series of commonly-accepted generalities with a series of opposing particularities.

C

The repetition of the words "all" and "some" functions to draw attention to the moral superiority of the defendant, as opposed to the case's petitioners.

D

The repetition of the words "all" and "some" functions to attempt to convert some arguable or debatable opinions into unimpeachable truisms.

E

The repetition of the words "all" and "some" functions to create a melodic cadence, pleasing to both orator and audience, regardless of the message.