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Fluorescence in situ hybridization, or FISH, is a laboratory technique that uses a single-stranded nucleic acid that is labeled with a fluorescent tag (a probe) to detect the chromosomal location of a specific DNA sequence (the target sequence).

A karyotype of the chromosomes is prepared from cells in metaphase of mitosis and the chromosomal DNA is denatured to allow the probe to hybridize to its complementary target sequence.

This technique can be used to identify cancer cells by their tendency to have an abnormal number of chromosomes, often too many copies of individual chromosomes.

Using FISH to probe for a single-copy gene carried on a autosome in cells from breast tissue, how many fluorescent signals for that gene would you expect to observe in a normal cell?

A

1

B

2

C

4

D

8

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