Pride and Prejudice

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Chapter Analysis

Though 19th century American male writers disdained Austen's writing as "sterile... imprisoned in [the] wretched conventions of English society... pinched and narrow" (Emerson), "Pride and Prejudice" remains among the most popular English novels ever written. Whether balls and drawing rooms constitute a "narrow" setting is debateable, but it is a fact now near-universally acknowledged that the "conventions of English society" provide delicious and thought-provoking fodder for questions of family, economics, female self-determination, and the relationship between marriage, reputation, and love. Discover why Austen's world continues to inspire countless modern-day adaptations — and build a case for why Emerson's critique is both outdated and deeply misguided.

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Volume II

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General Analysis

Austen is perhaps the best-known chronicler of the domestic life of the landed gentry during the Georgian period. Though the mores of the time were strictly governed by rigid gender roles, unforgiving social conventions, and a deep preoccupation with marriage, Austen's novels — and indeed, her life — have been read as highly subversive. In what ways can Pride and Prejudice function as a cry of dissent? Aside from comic relief, what commentary does Mr. and Mrs. Bennet's marriage provide? And what does Elizabeth's "prejudice" suggest about gender roles in Austen's world?

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Your status is based on your weighted accuracy which accounts for the difficulty of the questions.

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Social-Historical Context

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Social classes

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Gender roles

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Literary Devices

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Character Analysis

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Themes and Motifs

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