To Kill a Mockingbird

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Chapter Analysis

Gripped by the Great Depression, roiled by scandal, the "tired old town" of Maycomb, Alabama sees its racial and class tensions explode over three tumultuous years. To Kill A Mockingbird tells the story of these tensions and their painful resolutions. Harper Lee has been lauded for her "remarkable gift of storytelling." How does her language — as well as her use of satire, irony, and humor — undergird what might otherwise be a deeply painful novel? How does the novel's two-part structure contribute to (or detract from) its power? In what ways did Lee succeed (or not succeed) in her stated ambition to the "the Jane Austen of the South," detailing with infinite care the various foibles and genealogies of her Southern characters, and in what ways does this allow her to emphasize her characters' humanity, even at their most monstrous?

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Chapters 1-3Free

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Chapters 4-7

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Chapters 8-10

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Chapters 11-13

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Chapters 14-16

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Chapters 17-19

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Chapters 20-22

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Chapters 23-25

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Chapters 26-28

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Chapters 29-31

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General Analysis

Among the best-loved and acclaimed novels of the 20th century, To Kill A Mockingbird has been characterized as a Southern Gothic, a Bildungsroman, and a realistic look at the difficult issues of race, class, abuse, the search for gender parity, and the struggle to find a moral center in a world governed by hatred and inequity. How does Lee establish Atticus Finch as a steady moral voice in the novel? What does the novel owe to its child narrator, and how can we read the book as a feminist coming-of-age? As a satire? As a polemic for racial equity and grace?

CompletionAccuracy

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Status

Your status is based on your weighted accuracy which accounts for the difficulty of the questions.

Your weighted accuracy is based on your most recent attempts compared to everyone else’s first attempts.

Re-answering questions correctly will improve your weighted average status.

Literary Devices

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Social-Historical Context

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Themes and Motifs

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Character Analysis

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